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Toyota Mirai
FIRST DRIVE REVIEW
4.5

2019 Mirai

For commuters who live in a region where the hydrogen fueling infrastructure is already built out, opting for the 2019 Toyota Mirai may make a lot of sense. For starters, it's a genuinely futuristic experience since the Mirai is powered by a hydrogen fuel cell that converts the stuff of stars into electricity and water. This electricity goes to a small battery that drives the motor while the water leaves the tailpipe as vapor.

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Toyota 4Runner
INSTRUMENTED TEST
4.1

2019 Toyota 4Runner

TRD Pro has new Fox shock absorbers, new skid plate and roof rack, and standard sunroof and JBL sound system New Limited Nightshade Edition with black-out color scheme Part of the fifth 4Runner generation introduced for 2010.

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Toyota 86
BUYERS INFO
4.5

Advantages of Buying a New or Toyota 86

It's easy to pick on the 2019 Toyota 86 and count the ways it falls just short of excellent. It's small inside. There's limited passenger and cargo space. It's not particularly comfortable, especially for taller drivers, and its technology feels dated and inadequate.

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I purchased a tundra Saturday, as is no warrantee. Monday I removed an item I stalled on the floor board and noticed some rust under it. The more I dug the more i found. It was all under the carpet. The dealership would not have seen this because it was hidden under carpet. From underneath the vehicle it appeared rust was not an issue. Carpet held moisture and it ... rusted from the inside out. I sent pictures to the general manager and they went into action to ensure my satisfaction. I can't tell you how refreshing this was. I looked into laws at the federal and state level to see if I had a leg to stand on. I did not! 11 years old 142k miles. The vehicle was outside of any such laws I went in to talk to the dealership knowing they would make me happy, and that they did. They undid the deal no fee to me. Then asked me if I would like to see any other vehicles. Pleasure to do business with them. this Is my 3rd vehicle purchased here in 12 years and I will be back for all my vehicles in the future.
The Camry’s base L model has a four-cylinder engine, though the chance of a V6 or hybrid engine is available. That high-mileage hybrid option (up to 52 combined mpg), along with the Camry’s standard driver assists, reliability and resale value, could lure mid-size customers away from its competitors. In terms of technology, Apple CarPlay now comes standard (it didn’t prior to this year’s model) while Android users are at a loss. The trunk is also a little small, compared with other similar mid-size vehicles; in addition, unlike many of those other vehicles, the Camry doesn’t come with all-wheel drive, even as an option.
The Prius offers little in the way of driving enjoyment and refinement. Still, the steering effort is pleasingly weighted, and responses to your inputs are accurate—making the handling feel almost lively. Feedback from the road is non-existent, though, and feels numb on-center. Braking is a common gremlin for hybrid vehicles, which use a mix of regenerative and friction braking. Inconsistent or numb feedback from the pedal, as we experienced in the Prius, is often the trade-off and, combined with the low-rolling-resistance tires that most hybrids wear, can make for longer braking distances in our testing than we would expect from other similar-size non-hybrid vehicles.
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With mild, medium and hot versions, the Lexus GS lineup achieves a synthesis of comfort, luxury and performance. The GS 300 serves as the entry point with its turbocharged four-cylinder engine, with the next rung up occupied by the V6-powered GS 350. The GS F — with its brawny, old-school V8 (no turbo, thank you) — is a welcome foil to the high-performance turbocharged offerings from BMW and Mercedes. Regardless of powertrain, GS models feature top-quality interiors, a generous list of standard features, and sporty steering and handling. Unfortunately, the GS is plagued by an awkward infotainment interface that requires too much driver attention to operate, as well as subpar smartphone integration. But these are hardly deal-breakers since the GS compensates with cosseting luxury and a healthy dose of sport at a reasonable price. See the GS in our Sedan rankings
Unlike its predecessor, the Prime runs entirely on electricity in charge-depleting mode (EV mode).[90] Toyota targeted the fuel economy in hybrid mode to be equal or better than regular fourth generation Prius liftback. The Prius Prime has an EPA-rated combined fuel economy in hybrid mode of 54 mpg‑US (4.4 L/100 km; 65 mpg‑imp), 55 mpg‑US (4.3 L/100 km; 66 mpg‑imp) in city driving, and 53 mpg‑US (4.4 L/100 km; 64 mpg‑imp) in highway. Only the Prius Eco has a higher EPA-rated fuel economy rating in hybrid mode.[89] The 2017 model year Prime has a different exterior design than the fourth generation Prius. The interior design is also different.[87] The Prime has a four-seat cabin layout, as Toyota decided to improve the car's efficiency to achieve its design goals.[88]
MARK TAKAHASHI: The Toyota Prius has been the hybrid poster child for almost two decades. When it comes to fuel economy, it's really hard to beat the Prius. But it's front-wheel drive-only layout posed challenges for shoppers in weather-prone areas. That's all changed with this, the 2019 Toyota Prius. Do me a favor and hit Subscribe below. We have a lot more reviews coming your way. Compared to the 2018 Prius, the 2019 models, including the all-wheel drive, perform and behave much like its predecessor. They're not particularly sporty, but they get the job done, and that job is fuel economy. When it goes on sale in January of 2019, prices are going to start right around $27,000 for the all-wheel drive, which is only about $1,400 more than the front-wheel drive. Another big difference between the all-wheel drive and front-wheel drive Prius is going to be the battery packs. They've switched from the lithium ion for the front wheel drive to a nickel metal hydride battery pack for the all-wheel drive. That's because Toyota says the nickel metal hydride battery pack does a lot better with cold climates. When it comes to styling differences, they've actually gone simple. They took out some of the more complex and awkward shapes that were in the front right under the headlights, and they even shaved off the headlights to give it more of a conventional wrap-around look. The same holds true for the tail lights. There are a lot more simpler and horizontal. Overall, you still get all of the character that you've come to expect from a Prius, for better or for worse. Like the exterior, of the interior of the 2019 Prius sees some minor changes here and there. The most obvious is the white, glossy trim that kind of adorned everything inside, that's gone. They've replaced it with black. And, personally, I think it looks a lot better. They've also moved the seat heater switches from buried deep down under here to right here in from the cup holders. Another addition. They've added two USB ports right behind for the rear seats. Otherwise, a lot of it remains unchanged, and that's a good thing. The addition of the all-wheel drive motor and the battery pack doesn't affect cargo space or rear passenger space at all. All right, so when it comes to driving the new Prius all-wheel drive, there's not a big difference between this and the regular front-wheel drive. To be honest, I don't feel a difference at all. They say that the power output and efficiency is pretty much dead on. This gets two miles per gallon less, so 50 miles per gallon combined, versus 52 for the regular Prius, and 56 miles per gallon for their L Eco. The added electric motors on the rear axle, those come into play under initial acceleration from 0 to 6 miles an hour. And that's really just to help out on slippery surfaces. The motor will kick in from time to time, up to 43 miles an hour, when needed when slippage is detected. Unfortunately, they didn't get around to adding Apple CarPlay for the 2019 model. They are saying it will come eventually. If you ask me, it'll probably be in the next model year. And that's too bad, because the Toyota Entune system, in my opinion, is one of the worst infotainment systems to use. It's just overcomplicated, and it's lacking a lot of features that are made up by the features on your smartphone. So to give an indication of how different or how much better the all-wheel drive might be, they've set up this wonderful little snowy course for us. This is the front-wheel drive version. And we'll see how much of a handful it really is. Let's go plowing and see what happens. Oh, yeah. So it's not a lot of steering response. It's really just-- oh, it's kind of just struggling to get through. And there's a lot of work you can hear with the anti-locks kicking in there. But it made it through just fine. It didn't need a whole lot of steering correction. So we'll see how the all-wheel drive performs in comparison. All right, so there's one important difference, which is initial traction. The rear motors, they come into play from 0 to 6 miles an hour just to get you going. So we're going to go up this gentle little incline here to get a real good indication of if it really works or not. Here we go. OK, so a little bit of crabbing here and there, but it left the line just fine. And that was pretty deep snow, actually. And the front-wheel drive Prius actually won't even make it up that hill. So we are lined up onto the chicane course. Here we go. Going in about the same speed and same aggression. Oh, it's tracking way better. Wow. Yeah, it's not bogging down at all. It's just kind of kicking in. We had maybe 25 miles an hour there, and that was a marked improvement. Good on you, Toyota. The 2019 Prius maintains its advantage for fuel economy and keeps all of its character that we've come to expect. The addition of the all-wheel drive model? Well, that's a significant step forward. It really opens up the Prius to shoppers who normally wouldn't consider it because they lived in snowy areas. After driving it on this course, I can say it makes a difference. It makes a big difference, especially when you're just starting out from a dead stop. For more information on the Prius, as well as its competition, head on over to edmunds.com. To see more videos like this, hit Subscribe. [MUSIC PLAYING]
Despite the newly available all-wheel-drive system, we'd stick with the standard front-drive Prius. Still, those who live where there are more winter months than summer months may appreciate the improved all-weather capability. We prefer the eco-friendliest Prius, which is the entry-level L Eco. It lacks the fanciest options and creature comforts found on more expensive versions, but it has higher fuel-economy estimates from the EPA and solid standard features. These include two USB ports for the back seat, push-button start, passive entry on the driver's door, and numerous driver assists such as adaptive cruise control, automated emergency braking, and automatic high-beam headlights.
Shop Edmunds' car, SUV, and truck listings of over 6 million vehicles to find a cheap new, used, or certified pre-owned (CPO) 2019 Toyota Prius for sale near. There are currently 196 new 2019 Priuses listed for sale in your area, with list prices as low as $24,968 and mileage as low as 0 miles. Simply research the type of car you're interested in and then select a car from our massive database to find cheap vehicles for sale near you. Once you have identified a used vehicle you're interested in, check the Carfax and Autocheck vehicle history reports, read dealer reviews, and find out what other owners paid for the 2019 Toyota Prius. Then select Edmunds special offers, perks, deals, and incentives to contact the dealer of your choice and save up to $2,262 on a used or CPO 2019 Prius available from a dealership near you.
The AWD-e system adds a stand-alone electric motor, packaged within the rear multi-link suspension such that it does not intrude on the car's cabin or luggage compartment. The only connection between this compact, 7-hp motor and the standard 121-hp front-drive powertrain is electronic; there is no physical driveshaft. Toyota claims the system adds roughly 150 pounds, bringing curb weight to about 3300 pounds and dropping fuel economy a bit, to 50 mpg combined versus the front-drive variant's 52 to 56 mpg (depending on trim level). The only other significant change to the Prius that comes with adding all-wheel drive is in battery chemistry: All-wheel-drive cars use nickel-metal-hydride battery packs rather than lithium-ion, as NiMH performs better in cold weather.
Some American automakers (we’re looking at you, Ford and General Motors) are even planning to ditch some of their sedans, now that crossovers are the new darling of the midsize vehicle market. But that doesn’t mean you can’t still snag a great sedan. Newcomer Tesla is hitting the mid-size market hard, and foreign automakers like Honda, Toyota and Nissan are still in the game. And the sedan still holds appeal for many families with room for four — five, in a pinch — and a separate trunk.
The Prius NHW11 (sometimes referred to as "Generation II"[27]) was the first Prius sold by Toyota outside of Japan, with sales in limited numbers beginning in the year 2000 in Asia, America, Europe and Australia.[27][29] In the United States, the Prius was marketed between the smaller Corolla and the larger Camry. The published retail price of the car was US$19,995.[30] European sales began in September 2000.[31] The official launch of the Prius in Australia occurred at the October 2001 Sydney Motor Show,[32] although sales were slow until the NHW20 (XW20) model arrived. Toyota sold about 123,000 first generation Priuses.[9]
Although midsize sedans make up one of the largest car segments in production, most models follow a familiar recipe of features and offerings. In general, you can expect to find a base four-cylinder engine with an optional performance upgrade. At the luxury level, virtually every entrant offers all-wheel drive to entice buyers in harsher climates. A roomy cabin and a rear seat that's comfortable for large adults are common characteristics. Most midsize sedans will offer sizable trunks with 16 to 18 cubic feet of cargo space, but some trunks are on the smaller side, especially those in hybrid models.
Available Teen Driver offers an industry-first in-vehicle report card to help parents encourage better driving habits. The in-vehicle report card is visible on the available Chevrolet Infotainment 3 System† display. This built-in Teen Driver technology (if equipped) can help parents coach new drivers to become better drivers even when you are not in the car.
As the Prius reached ten years of being available in the US market, in February 2011 Consumer Reports examined the lifetime and replacement cost of the Prius battery. The magazine tested a 2002 Toyota Prius with over 200,000 miles on it, and compared the results to the nearly identical 2001 Prius with 2,000 miles tested by Consumer Reports 10 years before. The comparison showed little difference in performance when tested for fuel economy and acceleration. Overall fuel economy of the 2001 model was 40.6 miles per US gallon (5.79 L/100 km; 48.8 mpg‑imp) while the 2002 Prius with high mileage delivered 40.4 miles per US gallon (5.82 L/100 km; 48.5 mpg‑imp). The magazine concluded that the effectiveness of the battery has not degraded over the long run.[168] The cost of replacing the first generation battery varies between US$2,200 and US$2,600 from a Toyota dealer, but low-use units from salvage yards are available for around US$500.[168] One study indicates it may be worthwhile to rebuild batteries using good blades from defective used batteries.[169]
If you've chosen a midsize sedan over an SUV, you've already addressed some key buying concerns. Sedans get better gas mileage and handle better than SUVs, all else being equal, and there's something timelessly classy about a sleek sedan parked at the curb. When you're ready to buy, let Edmunds' expert reviews guide you to the midsize sedan of your dreams, whether it's a practical, no-nonsense commuter or an executive-class special with all the trimmings.
Advanced driver safety aids such as automatic emergency braking have become commonplace, but some automakers limit certain features to higher trim levels. For example, don't expect adaptive cruise control or blind-spot monitoring to come free with every model. Another thing to keep in mind is that there may be a range of infotainment systems on offer within a given model range, so make sure you check out any differences at the dealership before going with a lower-spec system.
What all-wheel drive won't do is help in the stopping department. Prius AWD-e models come shod with the same 15-inch, low-rolling-resistance Dunlop Enasave 01 all-season tires as front-drive Prius models. A good set of winter tires, even fitted to a front-drive Prius, would bring greater traction benefits to stopping as well as going. Mounted and balanced on a spare set of wheels, complete with TPMS sensors and wheel covers and shipped to your house from Tire Rack, these would run about $900. By comparison, the upcharge for all-wheel drive in a $25,900 Prius LE is $1400, and in the $28,740 XLE, it's $1000. Those are the two middle trims in Toyota's new Prius trim naming strategy; all-wheel drive is not available on the top-of-the-line Limited or the entry L Eco.
There's nothing mysterious about the midsize-car formula: four doors, room for five passengers, big trunk, decent power, good fuel economy, and up-to-date technology. Most mainstream family sedans start at around $24,000 and try to match each other feature for feature, making this one of the most competitive car segments you'll find. There are a number of good sedans out there, but these are our top picks.