Right in the heart of LONG BEACH, CA 90806

WORLD'S LEADING SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA TOYOTA DEALER

CALL TOYOTA OF LONG BEACH
AT (562) 270-1414 TODAY.

When you’re a Los Angeles or Orange County driver in search of your next ride, visiting our dealership in Long Beach is worth the trip. At our dealership, we offer diverse inventory as well as meaningful service. Avoid the traditional tricks or sales tactics used by many car dealers.

Our buying process is easy, straightforward, casual and fun! There is a reason we are ranked #1 for online reputation, why go anywhere else.

  • Diverse Inventory and Quality Service
  • Southern California's Source for New Toyota Cars
  • Valuable Used Cars for Your Driving Pleasure
  • A Fully Equipped Service Center for Your Maintenance Needs

AUTO LOANS

Trade-Ins

Buying guide

8 am to 8 pm support

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW

THE WORLD OF TOYOTA CARS & TRUCKS

Toyota Mirai
FIRST DRIVE REVIEW
4.5

2019 Mirai

For commuters who live in a region where the hydrogen fueling infrastructure is already built out, opting for the 2019 Toyota Mirai may make a lot of sense. For starters, it's a genuinely futuristic experience since the Mirai is powered by a hydrogen fuel cell that converts the stuff of stars into electricity and water. This electricity goes to a small battery that drives the motor while the water leaves the tailpipe as vapor.

READ MORE
Toyota 4Runner
INSTRUMENTED TEST
4.1

2019 Toyota 4Runner

TRD Pro has new Fox shock absorbers, new skid plate and roof rack, and standard sunroof and JBL sound system New Limited Nightshade Edition with black-out color scheme Part of the fifth 4Runner generation introduced for 2010.

READ MORE
Toyota 86
BUYERS INFO
4.5

Advantages of Buying a New or Toyota 86

It's easy to pick on the 2019 Toyota 86 and count the ways it falls just short of excellent. It's small inside. There's limited passenger and cargo space. It's not particularly comfortable, especially for taller drivers, and its technology feels dated and inadequate.

READ MORE

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A CAR?

Search Our Inventory With Thousands Of Cars And More Cars Are Adding On Daily Basis

DO YOU WANT TO SELL A CAR?

Search Our Inventory With Thousands Of Cars And More Cars Are Adding On Daily Basis

QUESTIONS? CALL US : 1-562-270-1414

Toyota of Long Beach
  • Low Prices, No Haggling
  • Largest Toyota Car Dealership
  • First Time Buyer

LATEST AUTOS

contact us

Long Beach Blvd, Long Beach, California 90014 USA
Phone: 1-562-270-1414
FAX: 1-562-270-1414
Toyota of Long Beach Map

As the Prius reached ten years of being available in the US market, in February 2011 Consumer Reports examined the lifetime and replacement cost of the Prius battery. The magazine tested a 2002 Toyota Prius with over 200,000 miles on it, and compared the results to the nearly identical 2001 Prius with 2,000 miles tested by Consumer Reports 10 years before. The comparison showed little difference in performance when tested for fuel economy and acceleration. Overall fuel economy of the 2001 model was 40.6 miles per US gallon (5.79 L/100 km; 48.8 mpg‑imp) while the 2002 Prius with high mileage delivered 40.4 miles per US gallon (5.82 L/100 km; 48.5 mpg‑imp). The magazine concluded that the effectiveness of the battery has not degraded over the long run.[168] The cost of replacing the first generation battery varies between US$2,200 and US$2,600 from a Toyota dealer, but low-use units from salvage yards are available for around US$500.[168] One study indicates it may be worthwhile to rebuild batteries using good blades from defective used batteries.[169]
During the 1970s, the intermediate class in the U.S. was generally defined as vehicles with wheelbases between 112 inches (2,845 mm) and 118 inches (2,997 mm). The domestic manufacturers began changing the definition of "medium" as they developed new models for an evolving market place.[5] A turning point occurred in the late 1970s, when rising fuel costs and government fuel economy regulations caused all car classes to shrink, and in many cases to blur. Automakers moved previously "full-size" nameplates to smaller platforms such as the Ford LTD II and the Plymouth Fury.[6] A comparison test by Popular Science of four intermediate sedans (the 1976 AMC Matador, Chevrolet Malibu, Ford Torino, and Dodge Coronet) predicted that these will be the "big cars of the future."[7] By 1978, General Motors made its intermediate models smaller.[8]
When the vehicle is turned on with the "Power" button, it is ready to drive immediately with the electric motor. In the North American second generation Prius, electric pumps warm the engine by pumping previously saved hot engine coolant from a coolant thermos[156] before the internal combustion engine is started. The delay between powering the car on and starting the internal combustion engine is a few seconds.[157] The third generation Prius does not have a coolant thermos. Instead, the engine is heated by recapturing exhaust heat. A button labelled "EV" maintains Electric Vehicle mode after being powered on and under most low-load conditions at less than 25 mph (40 km/h).[158] This permits driving with low noise and no fuel consumption for journeys under 0.5 miles (0.80 km).[159][160][161][162] Prior to the 2010 model, the North American model did not have the "EV" button, although one can be added to enable the "EV" mode supported internally by the Prius Hybrid Vehicle management computer.[163][164] For the N.American market, the third generation can remain in EV mode until 70 km/h (43 mph) depending on throttle and road gradient.[citation needed]
The Second Generation Prius contains a 1.310 kWh battery, composed of 28 modules. Each battery module is made of 6 individual 1.2 V 6.5 Ah Prismatic NiMH cells in series forming a 7.2 V 6.5 Ah module with 46 Wh/kg energy density and 1.3 kW/kg output power density.[167] Each module contains an integrated charge controller and relay. These modules are connected 28 in series to form a 201.6 V 6.5 Ah battery (traction battery), also known as the energy storage system. The computer controlled charge controller and battery management computer systems keep this battery between 38% and 82% state of charge, with a tendency to keep the average state of charge around 60%. By shallow cycling the battery only a small portion of its net available energy storage capacity is available for use (approximately 400 Wh) by the hybrid drive system, but the shallow computer controlled cycling dramatically improves the cycle life, thermal management control, and net long term calendar life of the battery. Active cooling of this battery is achieved by a blower motor and air ducting, while passive thermal management was accomplished through the metal case design.
Launched in Japan in 1997, the Toyota Prius hybrid made its U.S. debut in 2001 and sold only 15,000 units that first year. By 2011, U.S. sales reached the 1 million mark, and today global sales top 3.5 million. The Prius uses a gasoline engine and an electric motor with a battery pack. The hybrid system saves fuel by using the electric motor at low speeds, with the gas engine automatically turning on when needed. The Prius’ batteries are recharged by energy captured from braking and by the gasoline engine. Known for its distinctive styling, the Prius name has been applied to other hybrid offerings, including the Prius c, v and Prime. Toyota’s hybrid system found in the Prius is also used in hybrid versions of some of Toyota’s mainstream models. 
If you’ve always coveted a Tesla but didn’t want to spend close to six figures, this might be your route. It’s a mid-size electric car with plenty of technology, as expected with this brand. Additionally, the trunk is large enough to easily hold a mountain bike (as long as you fold the flat rear seats), and the interior cabin is large and comfortable. Consider the long-range battery version — approximated at an extra $7,000 — if you plan on driving longer distances.