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Toyota Mirai
FIRST DRIVE REVIEW
4.5

2019 Mirai

For commuters who live in a region where the hydrogen fueling infrastructure is already built out, opting for the 2019 Toyota Mirai may make a lot of sense. For starters, it's a genuinely futuristic experience since the Mirai is powered by a hydrogen fuel cell that converts the stuff of stars into electricity and water. This electricity goes to a small battery that drives the motor while the water leaves the tailpipe as vapor.

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Toyota 4Runner
INSTRUMENTED TEST
4.1

2019 Toyota 4Runner

TRD Pro has new Fox shock absorbers, new skid plate and roof rack, and standard sunroof and JBL sound system New Limited Nightshade Edition with black-out color scheme Part of the fifth 4Runner generation introduced for 2010.

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Toyota 86
BUYERS INFO
4.5

Advantages of Buying a New or Toyota 86

It's easy to pick on the 2019 Toyota 86 and count the ways it falls just short of excellent. It's small inside. There's limited passenger and cargo space. It's not particularly comfortable, especially for taller drivers, and its technology feels dated and inadequate.

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Presented at the April 2003 New York International Auto Show, for the 2004 US model year, the NHW20 Prius was a complete redesign. It became a compact liftback, sized between the Corolla and the Camry, with redistributed mechanical and interior space significantly increasing rear-seat legroom and luggage room. The second generation Prius is more environmentally friendly than the previous model (according to the EPA), and is 6 inches (150 mm) longer than the previous version.[38][39] Its more aerodynamic Kammback body balances length and wind resistance, resulting in a drag coefficient of Cd=0.26.[40] The development effort, led by chief engineer Shigeyuki Hori, led to 530 patents for the vehicle.[41]
Shop Edmunds' car, SUV, and truck listings of over 6 million vehicles to find a cheap new, used, or certified pre-owned (CPO) 2019 Toyota Prius for sale near. There are currently 196 new 2019 Priuses listed for sale in your area, with list prices as low as $24,968 and mileage as low as 0 miles. Simply research the type of car you're interested in and then select a car from our massive database to find cheap vehicles for sale near you. Once you have identified a used vehicle you're interested in, check the Carfax and Autocheck vehicle history reports, read dealer reviews, and find out what other owners paid for the 2019 Toyota Prius. Then select Edmunds special offers, perks, deals, and incentives to contact the dealer of your choice and save up to $2,262 on a used or CPO 2019 Prius available from a dealership near you.
The 2019 Toyota Prius is offered in the following submodels: Prius Hatchback. Available styles include LE 4dr Hatchback (1.8L 4cyl gas/electric hybrid CVT), XLE 4dr Hatchback (1.8L 4cyl gas/electric hybrid CVT), XLE AWD-e 4dr Hatchback AWD (1.8L 4cyl gas/electric hybrid CVT), Limited 4dr Hatchback (1.8L 4cyl gas/electric hybrid CVT), LE AWD-e 4dr Hatchback AWD (1.8L 4cyl gas/electric hybrid CVT), and L Eco 4dr Hatchback (1.8L 4cyl gas/electric hybrid CVT).

We also drove both cars on a flat but snow-covered road with an obstacle course that required a quick right-left S-turn. When we tried the maneuver in the front-drive Prius, its front tires were easily overwhelmed when we accelerated and steered at the same time. Because of that, it was hard to keep the car from running wide. With AWD-e, there was still some squirming through the course, but it was far more composed and easy to drive.
When the vehicle is turned on with the "Power" button, it is ready to drive immediately with the electric motor. In the North American second generation Prius, electric pumps warm the engine by pumping previously saved hot engine coolant from a coolant thermos[156] before the internal combustion engine is started. The delay between powering the car on and starting the internal combustion engine is a few seconds.[157] The third generation Prius does not have a coolant thermos. Instead, the engine is heated by recapturing exhaust heat. A button labelled "EV" maintains Electric Vehicle mode after being powered on and under most low-load conditions at less than 25 mph (40 km/h).[158] This permits driving with low noise and no fuel consumption for journeys under 0.5 miles (0.80 km).[159][160][161][162] Prior to the 2010 model, the North American model did not have the "EV" button, although one can be added to enable the "EV" mode supported internally by the Prius Hybrid Vehicle management computer.[163][164] For the N.American market, the third generation can remain in EV mode until 70 km/h (43 mph) depending on throttle and road gradient.[citation needed]
During a brief test drive on dry pavement, we were able to shake loose some rear-drive assistance during aggressive cornering, although this served more to confirm the existence of the rear motor than to improve handling. AWD-e does not bring with it any sort of performance-enhancing torque vectoring; the Prius is still happy to understeer. A few circles in a roundabout ("Big Ben! Parliament!") showed a narrow window of all-wheel-drive operation until stability control aggressively steps in. Given the sedate pace that most Prius drivers maintain, the rear wheels will rarely be powered, which is the way Toyota wants it, a necessity to maintain the Prius's fuel-sipping EPA numbers. On a short snow-covered course, however, the rear motor helped to get the car moving from a stop as promised and kept it moving through an inch or two of the white stuff. 

3rd Row Seating Adjustable Pedals Android Auto Anti-Theft Apple CarPlay Bed Liner Blind Spot Assist Bluetooth CD Player Climate Control Convertible Roof Cooled Seats Cruise Control Driver/Parking Assist Fog Lights Heated Mirrors Heated Seats Heated Steering Wheel iPod/iPhone Keyless Entry Keyless Start Leather Interior Memory Seats MP3 Navigation OnStar Power Liftgate Power Seats Power/Rear Shade Premium Entertainment Rain Sensing Wipers Rear Air/Heat Rearview Camera Roof/Cargo Rack Satellite Radio Side Airbags Steering Wheel Controls Sunroof/Moonroof Tinted Windows Tire Pressure Monitoring Touchscreen Towing Capability Valet Function/Key Xenon Headlights
The Prius uses electric motors in the hybrid propulsion systems, powered by a high voltage battery in the rear of the car. There has been some public concern over whether the levels of electromagnetic field exposure within the cabin are higher than comparable cars, and what health effects those fields may present, popularized by a 2008 The New York Times article.[192] However, Toyota[192] and several independent studies[193][194] have indicated that aside from a brief spike when accelerating, the electromagnetic fields within the Prius are no different from those of a conventional car and do not exceed the ICNIRP[195] exposure guidelines.
When the vehicle is turned on with the "Power" button, it is ready to drive immediately with the electric motor. In the North American second generation Prius, electric pumps warm the engine by pumping previously saved hot engine coolant from a coolant thermos[156] before the internal combustion engine is started. The delay between powering the car on and starting the internal combustion engine is a few seconds.[157] The third generation Prius does not have a coolant thermos. Instead, the engine is heated by recapturing exhaust heat. A button labelled "EV" maintains Electric Vehicle mode after being powered on and under most low-load conditions at less than 25 mph (40 km/h).[158] This permits driving with low noise and no fuel consumption for journeys under 0.5 miles (0.80 km).[159][160][161][162] Prior to the 2010 model, the North American model did not have the "EV" button, although one can be added to enable the "EV" mode supported internally by the Prius Hybrid Vehicle management computer.[163][164] For the N.American market, the third generation can remain in EV mode until 70 km/h (43 mph) depending on throttle and road gradient.[citation needed]
Low gasoline prices are partially to blame, but Toyota is also culpable. Redesigned fascias for the 2019 model are its admission that when the fourth-generation Prius debuted for 2016, it was an ugly baby. With less-angry headlights and a smoother, more conservative look, the new face and derriere can only be seen as an improvement, one applied to front-drive and all-wheel-drive cars alike. Some resurfacing inside replaces the blinding-white plastic trim that seemed dated from new with piano black, polishing the idea that after 20 years the Prius is still an aspirational product. 

In the UK, the Advertising Standards Authority, an independent body charged with policing the rules of the advertising industry, ruled that a television advert for the Toyota Prius should not be broadcast again in the same form, having breached rules concerning misleading advertising. The advertisement stated that the Prius "emits up to one tonne less CO


You’re ready to purchase your dream car. Before hitting the dealership, apply to a few lenders to see the best offers. These can include a bank, online lender or credit union. Or go to LendingTree, you can fill out an online form and receive up to five potential auto loan offers from lenders at once, instead of filling out five different lender applications. Then, head to the car dealer with your pre-approved auto loan.
For 2019, car shoppers have another reason to consider the Prius: available all-wheel drive. The new Prius AWD-e adds an electric motor to drive the rear wheels for better initial traction between 0 and 6 mph and re-engages when front tire slippage is detected at speeds up to 43 mph. If you live in an area that has snowy or icy roads during the winter, the AWD-e could provide extra traction. Fuel economy suffers only slightly with the Prius AWD-e.
Looking for a new 2019 or 2020 Toyota? Look no further than Toyota Universe in Little Falls, New Jersey. We offer a full lineup of new Toyota vehicles. Our knowledgeable Toyota Universe new car dealer staff is dedicated and will work with you to put you behind the wheel of the Toyota vehicle you want, at an affordable price. Feel free to browse our online inventory, request more information about our vehicles, or set up a test drive with a sales associate.

During a brief test drive on dry pavement, we were able to shake loose some rear-drive assistance during aggressive cornering, although this served more to confirm the existence of the rear motor than to improve handling. AWD-e does not bring with it any sort of performance-enhancing torque vectoring; the Prius is still happy to understeer. A few circles in a roundabout ("Big Ben! Parliament!") showed a narrow window of all-wheel-drive operation until stability control aggressively steps in. Given the sedate pace that most Prius drivers maintain, the rear wheels will rarely be powered, which is the way Toyota wants it, a necessity to maintain the Prius's fuel-sipping EPA numbers. On a short snow-covered course, however, the rear motor helped to get the car moving from a stop as promised and kept it moving through an inch or two of the white stuff.


Unlike its predecessor, the Prime runs entirely on electricity in charge-depleting mode (EV mode).[90] Toyota targeted the fuel economy in hybrid mode to be equal or better than regular fourth generation Prius liftback. The Prius Prime has an EPA-rated combined fuel economy in hybrid mode of 54 mpg‑US (4.4 L/100 km; 65 mpg‑imp), 55 mpg‑US (4.3 L/100 km; 66 mpg‑imp) in city driving, and 53 mpg‑US (4.4 L/100 km; 64 mpg‑imp) in highway. Only the Prius Eco has a higher EPA-rated fuel economy rating in hybrid mode.[89] The 2017 model year Prime has a different exterior design than the fourth generation Prius. The interior design is also different.[87] The Prime has a four-seat cabin layout, as Toyota decided to improve the car's efficiency to achieve its design goals.[88]
Several US companies offer employees incentives. Bank of America will reimburse US$3,000 on the purchase of new hybrid vehicles to full- and part-time associates working more than 20 hours per week.[218] Google,[219] software company Hyperion Solutions,[220] and organic food and drink producer Clif Bar & Co[218] offer employees a US$5,000 credit toward their purchase of certain hybrid vehicles including the Prius. Integrated Archive Systems, a Palo Alto IT company, offers a US$10,000 subsidy toward the purchase of hybrid vehicles to full-time employees employed more than one year.[218]
For the first time, the 2019 Toyota Prius is available with all-wheel drive. Its outward appearance is also slightly revised in an attempt to attract more buyers. The updates include new front and rear bumpers, more paint colors and wheel designs, revised LED head- and taillights, and a fresh rear hatch. Inside, the cabin layout is unchanged but there are new trim options. The Prius lineup also receives a new naming structure that drops the numerical names of old. Instead, the models now have titles that are similar to other Toyota products.
We went thru the USAA buyer program. Got a great quote from Bob Tyler, lower than the USAA price. We have bought cars from this dealer for 20 years. Had a great sales rep, Luis Vilar who was such a gentleman to deal with. Kim was the manager we also dealt with. Both were so lovely.If you want to buy a Toyota, see Luis Vilar, he is great and no pressure. You could be ... talking with your best friend.

Introduced to America in 1989, the Sonata has emerged as a major player within the past decade, fueled by confident design, a spacious cabin, and impressive standard features, all at an attractive price. Recent interior design changes have given the Sonata an even more upscale feel, and its infotainment system, while plain, is among the more user-friendly systems out there. A capacious trunk, numerous available trim levels, and a 42-mpg hybrid model also contribute to the Sonata's standing as one of the most compelling midsize car values. See the Sonata in our Sedan rankings
Although midsize sedans make up one of the largest car segments in production, most models follow a familiar recipe of features and offerings. In general, you can expect to find a base four-cylinder engine with an optional performance upgrade. At the luxury level, virtually every entrant offers all-wheel drive to entice buyers in harsher climates. A roomy cabin and a rear seat that's comfortable for large adults are common characteristics. Most midsize sedans will offer sizable trunks with 16 to 18 cubic feet of cargo space, but some trunks are on the smaller side, especially those in hybrid models.
The Second Generation Prius contains a 1.310 kWh battery, composed of 28 modules. Each battery module is made of 6 individual 1.2 V 6.5 Ah Prismatic NiMH cells in series forming a 7.2 V 6.5 Ah module with 46 Wh/kg energy density and 1.3 kW/kg output power density.[167] Each module contains an integrated charge controller and relay. These modules are connected 28 in series to form a 201.6 V 6.5 Ah battery (traction battery), also known as the energy storage system. The computer controlled charge controller and battery management computer systems keep this battery between 38% and 82% state of charge, with a tendency to keep the average state of charge around 60%. By shallow cycling the battery only a small portion of its net available energy storage capacity is available for use (approximately 400 Wh) by the hybrid drive system, but the shallow computer controlled cycling dramatically improves the cycle life, thermal management control, and net long term calendar life of the battery. Active cooling of this battery is achieved by a blower motor and air ducting, while passive thermal management was accomplished through the metal case design.
^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "Worldwide Sales of Toyota Hybrids Surpass 10 Million Units" (Press release). Toyota City, Japan: Toyota. 14 January 2017. Retrieved 15 January 2017. This latest milestone of 10 million units was achieved just nine months after total sales reached 9 million units at the end of April 2016. The Prius family accounts for 61% of Toyota's total global cumulative hybrid car sales: 6.115 million units, consisting of Prius liftback: 3.9846 million; Aqua, Prius c: 1.3801 million; Prius α, Prius v, Prius +: 614,700; and Prius PHV: 79,300.
The Prius's hybrid powertrain is not capable of delivering thrilling or even amusing acceleration. Its lethargy can't be given a free pass, as other competitors prove that acceptable performance need not be sacrificed in the pursuit of world-beating fuel economy. The all-wheel-drive versions feature an electric motor that functions separately from the hybrid system and powers the rear wheels.
We sampled both the standard front-wheel-drive Prius and the Prius AWD-e on a snow-covered course in Wisconsin to experience the differences firsthand. On a rather conservative uphill grade, the front-drive Prius was unable to find the traction to climb. The AWD-e, in contrast, was able to get up the hill. Its front wheels struggled briefly to pull the car upward until the rear wheels gave it the nudge they needed. There was a slight lateral creep when the front wheels spun freely, but the Prius never felt as though it would veer off the intended path.