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When you’re a Los Angeles or Orange County driver in search of your next ride, visiting our dealership in Long Beach is worth the trip. At our dealership, we offer diverse inventory as well as meaningful service. Avoid the traditional tricks or sales tactics used by many car dealers.

Our buying process is easy, straightforward, casual and fun! There is a reason we are ranked #1 for online reputation, why go anywhere else.

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Toyota Mirai
FIRST DRIVE REVIEW
4.5

2019 Mirai

For commuters who live in a region where the hydrogen fueling infrastructure is already built out, opting for the 2019 Toyota Mirai may make a lot of sense. For starters, it's a genuinely futuristic experience since the Mirai is powered by a hydrogen fuel cell that converts the stuff of stars into electricity and water. This electricity goes to a small battery that drives the motor while the water leaves the tailpipe as vapor.

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Toyota 4Runner
INSTRUMENTED TEST
4.1

2019 Toyota 4Runner

TRD Pro has new Fox shock absorbers, new skid plate and roof rack, and standard sunroof and JBL sound system New Limited Nightshade Edition with black-out color scheme Part of the fifth 4Runner generation introduced for 2010.

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Toyota 86
BUYERS INFO
4.5

Advantages of Buying a New or Toyota 86

It's easy to pick on the 2019 Toyota 86 and count the ways it falls just short of excellent. It's small inside. There's limited passenger and cargo space. It's not particularly comfortable, especially for taller drivers, and its technology feels dated and inadequate.

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Toyota of Long Beach
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Long Beach Blvd, Long Beach, California 90014 USA
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Enjoy Toyota financing services near Newark, NJ, visit our new and used dealership today! Our Route 22 Toyota's finance department works with auto shoppers of all backgrounds and credit scores, and we're dedicated to ensuring you're able to review comprehensive packages that offer competitive terms. From sub-prime credit scores to no credit or those with pristine scores, Route 22 Toyota has a loan solution for you. Visit us to apply for Toyota financing or use our interactive website to complete one of our credit applications from your nearby Elizabeth home now!

With mild, medium and hot versions, the Lexus GS lineup achieves a synthesis of comfort, luxury and performance. The GS 300 serves as the entry point with its turbocharged four-cylinder engine, with the next rung up occupied by the V6-powered GS 350. The GS F — with its brawny, old-school V8 (no turbo, thank you) — is a welcome foil to the high-performance turbocharged offerings from BMW and Mercedes. Regardless of powertrain, GS models feature top-quality interiors, a generous list of standard features, and sporty steering and handling. Unfortunately, the GS is plagued by an awkward infotainment interface that requires too much driver attention to operate, as well as subpar smartphone integration. But these are hardly deal-breakers since the GS compensates with cosseting luxury and a healthy dose of sport at a reasonable price. See the GS in our Sedan rankings
We also drove both cars on a flat but snow-covered road with an obstacle course that required a quick right-left S-turn. When we tried the maneuver in the front-drive Prius, its front tires were easily overwhelmed when we accelerated and steered at the same time. Because of that, it was hard to keep the car from running wide. With AWD-e, there was still some squirming through the course, but it was far more composed and easy to drive.
The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and California Air Resources Board (CARB) rate the Prius as among the cleanest vehicles sold in the United States, based on smog-forming emissions.[1] The 2018 model year Prius Eco ranks as the second most fuel efficient gasoline-powered car available in the US without plug-in capability, following the Hyundai Ioniq "Blue".[2][3]
New "official" size designations in the U.S. were introduced by the EPA, which defined market segments by passenger and cargo space.[10] Formerly mid-sized cars that were built on the same platform, like the AMC Matador sedan, had a combined passenger and cargo volume of 130 cubic feet (3.68 m3), and were now considered "full-size" automobiles.[11][12]
If the vehicle is traveling at a low speed and the camera-based system detects that a front-end collision is imminent while following a detected vehicle and the driver has not already applied the system can automatically apply the brakes to potentially help reduce the collision’s severity. The system may even help avoid the collision at very low speeds.  
Along with updated styling, the Prius grew for 2016, increasing cargo space. A new platform improved handling and ride. Though output from the carryover engine decreased slightly, thanks to lighter hybrid components fuel mileage estimates increased to 54 mpg in the city and 50 mpg on the highway; an Eco version was even more efficient. Lithium-ion batteries are now used on some variations. Six trim levels are offered. 
If you've chosen a midsize sedan over an SUV, you've already addressed some key buying concerns. Sedans get better gas mileage and handle better than SUVs, all else being equal, and there's something timelessly classy about a sleek sedan parked at the curb. When you're ready to buy, let Edmunds' expert reviews guide you to the midsize sedan of your dreams, whether it's a practical, no-nonsense commuter or an executive-class special with all the trimmings.
Despite the newly available all-wheel-drive system, we'd stick with the standard front-drive Prius. Still, those who live where there are more winter months than summer months may appreciate the improved all-weather capability. We prefer the eco-friendliest Prius, which is the entry-level L Eco. It lacks the fanciest options and creature comforts found on more expensive versions, but it has higher fuel-economy estimates from the EPA and solid standard features. These include two USB ports for the back seat, push-button start, passive entry on the driver's door, and numerous driver assists such as adaptive cruise control, automated emergency braking, and automatic high-beam headlights.
Available also as a hybrid, sports model or a standard, this is a top mid-size sedan with a fuel economy of 30 in the city and 38 for the highway. It’s dependable, easy to drive, energy efficient and powerful, and even its base model has a 33 mile-per-gallon combined fuel economy — with the hybrid option offering 48 MPG combined. It comes with a standard 192-horsepower 1.5-liter engine, though if you spring for the 2.0-liter turbo, you’ll get 252 horsepower and 273 lb-ft of torque (though the mileage ratings are not nearly as good). This year’s model hasn’t changed much since last year, however, so if you want to save a little money, consider purchasing this vehicle used.
When the vehicle is turned on with the "Power" button, it is ready to drive immediately with the electric motor. In the North American second generation Prius, electric pumps warm the engine by pumping previously saved hot engine coolant from a coolant thermos[156] before the internal combustion engine is started. The delay between powering the car on and starting the internal combustion engine is a few seconds.[157] The third generation Prius does not have a coolant thermos. Instead, the engine is heated by recapturing exhaust heat. A button labelled "EV" maintains Electric Vehicle mode after being powered on and under most low-load conditions at less than 25 mph (40 km/h).[158] This permits driving with low noise and no fuel consumption for journeys under 0.5 miles (0.80 km).[159][160][161][162] Prior to the 2010 model, the North American model did not have the "EV" button, although one can be added to enable the "EV" mode supported internally by the Prius Hybrid Vehicle management computer.[163][164] For the N.American market, the third generation can remain in EV mode until 70 km/h (43 mph) depending on throttle and road gradient.[citation needed]
Launched in Japan in 1997, the Toyota Prius hybrid made its U.S. debut in 2001 and sold only 15,000 units that first year. By 2011, U.S. sales reached the 1 million mark, and today global sales top 3.5 million. The Prius uses a gasoline engine and an electric motor with a battery pack. The hybrid system saves fuel by using the electric motor at low speeds, with the gas engine automatically turning on when needed. The Prius’ batteries are recharged by energy captured from braking and by the gasoline engine. Known for its distinctive styling, the Prius name has been applied to other hybrid offerings, including the Prius c, v and Prime. Toyota’s hybrid system found in the Prius is also used in hybrid versions of some of Toyota’s mainstream models. 
Rising oil prices caused by the Arab Spring led to increased sales of the Prius in the first quarter of 2011, but the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami led to a production stoppage. Production restarted several days later, but output was hindered due to shortages from parts suppliers.[119] Nevertheless, during the 2011 Japanese fiscal year (1 April 2011 through 31 March 2012), the Prius family sold 310,484 units, including sales of the Prius α, launched in May 2011, and the Toyota Aqua, launched in December, allowing the Prius brand to become the best-selling vehicle in Japan for the third-consecutive year.[120]
As the Prius reached ten years of being available in the US market, in February 2011 Consumer Reports examined the lifetime and replacement cost of the Prius battery. The magazine tested a 2002 Toyota Prius with over 200,000 miles on it, and compared the results to the nearly identical 2001 Prius with 2,000 miles tested by Consumer Reports 10 years before. The comparison showed little difference in performance when tested for fuel economy and acceleration. Overall fuel economy of the 2001 model was 40.6 miles per US gallon (5.79 L/100 km; 48.8 mpg‑imp) while the 2002 Prius with high mileage delivered 40.4 miles per US gallon (5.82 L/100 km; 48.5 mpg‑imp). The magazine concluded that the effectiveness of the battery has not degraded over the long run.[168] The cost of replacing the first generation battery varies between US$2,200 and US$2,600 from a Toyota dealer, but low-use units from salvage yards are available for around US$500.[168] One study indicates it may be worthwhile to rebuild batteries using good blades from defective used batteries.[169]
But any Prius comes with a trade-off: performance. The Prius is neither quick nor engaging to drive. Additionally, its infotainment system isn't the easiest to use and lacks Apple CarPlay or Android Auto smartphone integration. But for shoppers seeking the most return per gallon, that's easily forgivable. Along with the Honda Insight, the Prius is one of our top recommended hybrids for 2019.
In addition to being the Smart Way to Buy™, new and used car shoppers buy from Route 22 Toyota for a number of reasons. We pride ourselves on being an auto industry leader in innovation and provide customized sales, finance and maintenance assistance. We're also a dealership that stays actively involved in the communities we serve, like sponsoring the local Boys and Girls Club, so if you're looking to shop a car dealer that gives back to the community, contact Route 22 Toyota in Hillside, New Jersey today!
Debuting in the U.S. as a compact sedan, the Prius had a 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine making 70 hp, paired with a 44-hp electric motor with nickel metal hydride batteries. It was rated 52/45 mpg city/highway on the old EPA rating system, later revised to 42/41. The first Prius was criticized for its nonlinear brake feel, abnormal tire wear and subpar safety ratings.
The Prius is all about fuel economy and the base L Eco's 56 mpg combined EPA estimate is difficult to ignore. Unfortunately, the L is a little light on features. As such, we recommend getting the LE. It comes with some useful upgrades, such as blind-spot monitoring, a rear wiper and a traditional spare tire, while keeping the price reasonable. The LE is also available with the Prius' new all-wheel-drive system.

What all-wheel drive won't do is help in the stopping department. Prius AWD-e models come shod with the same 15-inch, low-rolling-resistance Dunlop Enasave 01 all-season tires as front-drive Prius models. A good set of winter tires, even fitted to a front-drive Prius, would bring greater traction benefits to stopping as well as going. Mounted and balanced on a spare set of wheels, complete with TPMS sensors and wheel covers and shipped to your house from Tire Rack, these would run about $900. By comparison, the upcharge for all-wheel drive in a $25,900 Prius LE is $1400, and in the $28,740 XLE, it's $1000. Those are the two middle trims in Toyota's new Prius trim naming strategy; all-wheel drive is not available on the top-of-the-line Limited or the entry L Eco.
There are two principal battery packs, the High Voltage (HV) battery, also known as the traction battery, and a 12 volt battery known as the Low Voltage (LV) battery. The traction battery of the first generation Prius update (2000 onwards) was a sealed 38-module nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery pack providing 273.6 volt, 6.5 Ah capacity and weighing 53.3 kg (118 lb)[165] and is supplied by Japan's Panasonic EV Energy Co. They are normally charged between 40–60% of maximum capacity to prolong battery life as well as allow headroom for regenerative braking. Each battery pack uses 10–15 kg (22–33 lb) of lanthanum, and each Prius electric motor contains 1 kg (2 lb) of neodymium; production of the car is described as "the biggest user of rare earths of any object in the world."[166] The LV battery is essential to starting the car and providing initial power to the computer.
In 1995, Toyota debuted a hybrid concept car at the Tokyo Motor Show, with testing following a year later.[24] The first Prius, model NHW10, went on sale on 10 December 1997.[25][26] The first generation Prius (NHW10) was available only in Japan, though it has been imported privately to at least the United States, United Kingdom, Australia,[not in citation given][dubious – discuss] and New Zealand.[27]
If the vehicle is traveling at a low speed and the camera-based system detects that a front-end collision is imminent while following a detected vehicle and the driver has not already applied the system can automatically apply the brakes to potentially help reduce the collision’s severity. The system may even help avoid the collision at very low speeds.
During a brief test drive on dry pavement, we were able to shake loose some rear-drive assistance during aggressive cornering, although this served more to confirm the existence of the rear motor than to improve handling. AWD-e does not bring with it any sort of performance-enhancing torque vectoring; the Prius is still happy to understeer. A few circles in a roundabout ("Big Ben! Parliament!") showed a narrow window of all-wheel-drive operation until stability control aggressively steps in. Given the sedate pace that most Prius drivers maintain, the rear wheels will rarely be powered, which is the way Toyota wants it, a necessity to maintain the Prius's fuel-sipping EPA numbers. On a short snow-covered course, however, the rear motor helped to get the car moving from a stop as promised and kept it moving through an inch or two of the white stuff.