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Toyota Mirai
FIRST DRIVE REVIEW
4.5

2019 Mirai

For commuters who live in a region where the hydrogen fueling infrastructure is already built out, opting for the 2019 Toyota Mirai may make a lot of sense. For starters, it's a genuinely futuristic experience since the Mirai is powered by a hydrogen fuel cell that converts the stuff of stars into electricity and water. This electricity goes to a small battery that drives the motor while the water leaves the tailpipe as vapor.

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Toyota 4Runner
INSTRUMENTED TEST
4.1

2019 Toyota 4Runner

TRD Pro has new Fox shock absorbers, new skid plate and roof rack, and standard sunroof and JBL sound system New Limited Nightshade Edition with black-out color scheme Part of the fifth 4Runner generation introduced for 2010.

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Toyota 86
BUYERS INFO
4.5

Advantages of Buying a New or Toyota 86

It's easy to pick on the 2019 Toyota 86 and count the ways it falls just short of excellent. It's small inside. There's limited passenger and cargo space. It's not particularly comfortable, especially for taller drivers, and its technology feels dated and inadequate.

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When the vehicle is turned on with the "Power" button, it is ready to drive immediately with the electric motor. In the North American second generation Prius, electric pumps warm the engine by pumping previously saved hot engine coolant from a coolant thermos[156] before the internal combustion engine is started. The delay between powering the car on and starting the internal combustion engine is a few seconds.[157] The third generation Prius does not have a coolant thermos. Instead, the engine is heated by recapturing exhaust heat. A button labelled "EV" maintains Electric Vehicle mode after being powered on and under most low-load conditions at less than 25 mph (40 km/h).[158] This permits driving with low noise and no fuel consumption for journeys under 0.5 miles (0.80 km).[159][160][161][162] Prior to the 2010 model, the North American model did not have the "EV" button, although one can be added to enable the "EV" mode supported internally by the Prius Hybrid Vehicle management computer.[163][164] For the N.American market, the third generation can remain in EV mode until 70 km/h (43 mph) depending on throttle and road gradient.[citation needed]
When the vehicle is turned on with the "Power" button, it is ready to drive immediately with the electric motor. In the North American second generation Prius, electric pumps warm the engine by pumping previously saved hot engine coolant from a coolant thermos[156] before the internal combustion engine is started. The delay between powering the car on and starting the internal combustion engine is a few seconds.[157] The third generation Prius does not have a coolant thermos. Instead, the engine is heated by recapturing exhaust heat. A button labelled "EV" maintains Electric Vehicle mode after being powered on and under most low-load conditions at less than 25 mph (40 km/h).[158] This permits driving with low noise and no fuel consumption for journeys under 0.5 miles (0.80 km).[159][160][161][162] Prior to the 2010 model, the North American model did not have the "EV" button, although one can be added to enable the "EV" mode supported internally by the Prius Hybrid Vehicle management computer.[163][164] For the N.American market, the third generation can remain in EV mode until 70 km/h (43 mph) depending on throttle and road gradient.[citation needed]
When the vehicle is turned on with the "Power" button, it is ready to drive immediately with the electric motor. In the North American second generation Prius, electric pumps warm the engine by pumping previously saved hot engine coolant from a coolant thermos[156] before the internal combustion engine is started. The delay between powering the car on and starting the internal combustion engine is a few seconds.[157] The third generation Prius does not have a coolant thermos. Instead, the engine is heated by recapturing exhaust heat. A button labelled "EV" maintains Electric Vehicle mode after being powered on and under most low-load conditions at less than 25 mph (40 km/h).[158] This permits driving with low noise and no fuel consumption for journeys under 0.5 miles (0.80 km).[159][160][161][162] Prior to the 2010 model, the North American model did not have the "EV" button, although one can be added to enable the "EV" mode supported internally by the Prius Hybrid Vehicle management computer.[163][164] For the N.American market, the third generation can remain in EV mode until 70 km/h (43 mph) depending on throttle and road gradient.[citation needed]
In 1995, Toyota debuted a hybrid concept car at the Tokyo Motor Show, with testing following a year later.[24] The first Prius, model NHW10, went on sale on 10 December 1997.[25][26] The first generation Prius (NHW10) was available only in Japan, though it has been imported privately to at least the United States, United Kingdom, Australia,[not in citation given][dubious – discuss] and New Zealand.[27]
The Audi A6 has been redesigned for 2019 with an emphasis on evolutionary improvements. Like its predecessor, the new A6 delivers space, technology, luxury and performance in spades, but it's more refined and advanced than ever. Most of the changes for 2019 center on the A6's technology offerings, including additional advanced driver safety aids and a new dual-touchscreen interface that replaces the old knob-based MMI system. Equipped with a velvety-smooth turbocharged V6, the A6 won't leave you pining for more acceleration, although you may find yourself wanting a softer ride. With its typically European sporting bias, the all-wheel-drive A6 rides a tad firmer than some shoppers might prefer, but it's a remarkably well-rounded car overall. See the A6 in our Sedan rankings
Simply put, the Prius AWD-e is more sure-footed and capable on snow — precisely what the added mechanicals intended to deliver. We'd also like to point out that these vehicles were equipped with the standard low-rolling-resistance tires that are focused on fuel efficiency rather than traction. Switching to all-season or snow tires would likely yield even better results.
When the vehicle is turned on with the "Power" button, it is ready to drive immediately with the electric motor. In the North American second generation Prius, electric pumps warm the engine by pumping previously saved hot engine coolant from a coolant thermos[156] before the internal combustion engine is started. The delay between powering the car on and starting the internal combustion engine is a few seconds.[157] The third generation Prius does not have a coolant thermos. Instead, the engine is heated by recapturing exhaust heat. A button labelled "EV" maintains Electric Vehicle mode after being powered on and under most low-load conditions at less than 25 mph (40 km/h).[158] This permits driving with low noise and no fuel consumption for journeys under 0.5 miles (0.80 km).[159][160][161][162] Prior to the 2010 model, the North American model did not have the "EV" button, although one can be added to enable the "EV" mode supported internally by the Prius Hybrid Vehicle management computer.[163][164] For the N.American market, the third generation can remain in EV mode until 70 km/h (43 mph) depending on throttle and road gradient.[citation needed]
When the vehicle is turned on with the "Power" button, it is ready to drive immediately with the electric motor. In the North American second generation Prius, electric pumps warm the engine by pumping previously saved hot engine coolant from a coolant thermos[156] before the internal combustion engine is started. The delay between powering the car on and starting the internal combustion engine is a few seconds.[157] The third generation Prius does not have a coolant thermos. Instead, the engine is heated by recapturing exhaust heat. A button labelled "EV" maintains Electric Vehicle mode after being powered on and under most low-load conditions at less than 25 mph (40 km/h).[158] This permits driving with low noise and no fuel consumption for journeys under 0.5 miles (0.80 km).[159][160][161][162] Prior to the 2010 model, the North American model did not have the "EV" button, although one can be added to enable the "EV" mode supported internally by the Prius Hybrid Vehicle management computer.[163][164] For the N.American market, the third generation can remain in EV mode until 70 km/h (43 mph) depending on throttle and road gradient.[citation needed]
The Second Generation Prius contains a 1.310 kWh battery, composed of 28 modules. Each battery module is made of 6 individual 1.2 V 6.5 Ah Prismatic NiMH cells in series forming a 7.2 V 6.5 Ah module with 46 Wh/kg energy density and 1.3 kW/kg output power density.[167] Each module contains an integrated charge controller and relay. These modules are connected 28 in series to form a 201.6 V 6.5 Ah battery (traction battery), also known as the energy storage system. The computer controlled charge controller and battery management computer systems keep this battery between 38% and 82% state of charge, with a tendency to keep the average state of charge around 60%. By shallow cycling the battery only a small portion of its net available energy storage capacity is available for use (approximately 400 Wh) by the hybrid drive system, but the shallow computer controlled cycling dramatically improves the cycle life, thermal management control, and net long term calendar life of the battery. Active cooling of this battery is achieved by a blower motor and air ducting, while passive thermal management was accomplished through the metal case design.

The Prius offers Toyota's in-house Entune software for smartphone integration. Setup requires a lengthy app download and account creation process. Entune's app support is meager and less intuitive than CarPlay or Android Auto (neither of which is offered). The Bluetooth menu offers better control and search functionality than most other Bluetooth systems.

Available also as a hybrid, sports model or a standard, this is a top mid-size sedan with a fuel economy of 30 in the city and 38 for the highway. It’s dependable, easy to drive, energy efficient and powerful, and even its base model has a 33 mile-per-gallon combined fuel economy — with the hybrid option offering 48 MPG combined. It comes with a standard 192-horsepower 1.5-liter engine, though if you spring for the 2.0-liter turbo, you’ll get 252 horsepower and 273 lb-ft of torque (though the mileage ratings are not nearly as good). This year’s model hasn’t changed much since last year, however, so if you want to save a little money, consider purchasing this vehicle used.
For 2019, car shoppers have another reason to consider the Prius: available all-wheel drive. The new Prius AWD-e adds an electric motor to drive the rear wheels for better initial traction between 0 and 6 mph and re-engages when front tire slippage is detected at speeds up to 43 mph. If you live in an area that has snowy or icy roads during the winter, the AWD-e could provide extra traction. Fuel economy suffers only slightly with the Prius AWD-e. 

Consumer ratings and reviews are also available for the 2019 Toyota Prius and all its trim types. Overall, Edmunds users rate the 2019 Prius 5 on a scale of 1 to 5 stars. Edmunds consumer reviews allow users to sift through aggregated consumer reviews to understand what other drivers are saying about any vehicle in our database. Detailed rating breakdowns (including performance, comfort, value, interior, exterior design, build quality, and reliability) are available as well to provide shoppers with a comprehensive understanding of why customers like the 2019 Prius.
Stepping up to the XLE trim brings 17-inch wheels, automatic wipers, keyless entry for the front passenger door and rear hatch, SofTex simulated leather upholstery and wrapped steering wheel, a power-adjustable driver's seat, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a semi-gloss black center console and a wireless charging pad. It also reverts back to the tire inflation kit.
Available also as a hybrid, sports model or a standard, this is a top mid-size sedan with a fuel economy of 30 in the city and 38 for the highway. It’s dependable, easy to drive, energy efficient and powerful, and even its base model has a 33 mile-per-gallon combined fuel economy — with the hybrid option offering 48 MPG combined. It comes with a standard 192-horsepower 1.5-liter engine, though if you spring for the 2.0-liter turbo, you’ll get 252 horsepower and 273 lb-ft of torque (though the mileage ratings are not nearly as good). This year’s model hasn’t changed much since last year, however, so if you want to save a little money, consider purchasing this vehicle used.
The AWD-e system adds a stand-alone electric motor, packaged within the rear multi-link suspension such that it does not intrude on the car's cabin or luggage compartment. The only connection between this compact, 7-hp motor and the standard 121-hp front-drive powertrain is electronic; there is no physical driveshaft. Toyota claims the system adds roughly 150 pounds, bringing curb weight to about 3300 pounds and dropping fuel economy a bit, to 50 mpg combined versus the front-drive variant's 52 to 56 mpg (depending on trim level). The only other significant change to the Prius that comes with adding all-wheel drive is in battery chemistry: All-wheel-drive cars use nickel-metal-hydride battery packs rather than lithium-ion, as NiMH performs better in cold weather.

In late November 2018, for the 2019 model year, the U.S. market Prius lineup introduced an all-wheel drive model featuring Toyota's E-Four system. This has been available for the Japanese market Prius since 2015 and the hybrid versions of the RAV4 and Lexus NX.[70] Also, the Prius received a facelift with redesigned headlights and taillights, which was released in Japan on December 17, 2018.[71]
During a brief test drive on dry pavement, we were able to shake loose some rear-drive assistance during aggressive cornering, although this served more to confirm the existence of the rear motor than to improve handling. AWD-e does not bring with it any sort of performance-enhancing torque vectoring; the Prius is still happy to understeer. A few circles in a roundabout ("Big Ben! Parliament!") showed a narrow window of all-wheel-drive operation until stability control aggressively steps in. Given the sedate pace that most Prius drivers maintain, the rear wheels will rarely be powered, which is the way Toyota wants it, a necessity to maintain the Prius's fuel-sipping EPA numbers. On a short snow-covered course, however, the rear motor helped to get the car moving from a stop as promised and kept it moving through an inch or two of the white stuff.
Despite the newly available all-wheel-drive system, we'd stick with the standard front-drive Prius. Still, those who live where there are more winter months than summer months may appreciate the improved all-weather capability. We prefer the eco-friendliest Prius, which is the entry-level L Eco. It lacks the fanciest options and creature comforts found on more expensive versions, but it has higher fuel-economy estimates from the EPA and solid standard features. These include two USB ports for the back seat, push-button start, passive entry on the driver's door, and numerous driver assists such as adaptive cruise control, automated emergency braking, and automatic high-beam headlights.
The Prius will be available with all-wheel drive — Toyota calls it AWD-e — in its midgrade trim levels. The hybrid system under the hood returns unchanged, but Toyota added another electric motor between the rear wheels. It provides additional traction upon initial acceleration and, when needed, up to 43 mph. In order to better cope with colder climates, Toyota also replaced the usual lithium-ion battery pack with a nickel-metal hydride unit on the AWD-e.
In keeping with the Prius becoming more mainstream, the numeral-based trim levels have been replaced with a more familiar structure of names including L Eco, LE, XLE and Limited. Of these, the AWD-e will be offered only in the midgrade trims. As with the previous model, the 2019 Prius will continue to receive an ample list of standard advanced safety features bundled in the Toyota Safety Sense P suite.
Standard connectivity available only to original purchaser for 10 years. Connected access services are subject to change. Does not include emergency or security services. Vehicle diagnostics capabilities vary by model and plan. Message and data rates may apply. Requires contact method on file and enrollment to receive alerts. Not all issues will deliver alerts. See onstar.com for detail and limitations.
The Prius offers Toyota's in-house Entune software for smartphone integration. Setup requires a lengthy app download and account creation process. Entune's app support is meager and less intuitive than CarPlay or Android Auto (neither of which is offered). The Bluetooth menu offers better control and search functionality than most other Bluetooth systems.